On their latest tracks “Macey Park,” and “Wide Awake,” Mnemonist, a local Boston trio, pushes the strict categorization of its name. Unlike an individual with near total-recall, Mnemonist dwells in an atmosphere of contemplation that resists singularity despite its indie-rock form.

Today’s premiere takes place against the backdrop of Back Bay’s French Cultural Center, a space fitting for Mnemonist’s work. The dark wood, cherub-shaped sconces, and air of elegance provide an elevated intimacy perfect for Mnemonist’s slower, introspective songwriting. Keyboardist Emanuele Leoncini opens “Macey Park” with a keyboard line that laces the retro-reminiscence of Tennis with glimpses of amorphous electronica.

Guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter Brett West notes that the opening progression elicits “a mood of resignation,” that inhabits their non-traditional structures. Lethargic guitar chords bolster West’s crooning and provide a backdrop fitting for the lines that follow: “And to walk in circles just for fun.” He further notes that this ambiguity “is an attempt to capture subconscious experience,” in part achieved by the track’s limited demos.

Both “Macey Park,” and the more lilting “Wide Awake” showcase intricacies that Mnemonist’s three-piece format fosters. For West, this increased focus “on the essentials of writing,” allows for the subtle instrumental experimentation that differentiates Mnemonist’s music from more traditional indie rockers. Drummer Phil Culbertson deliberately plays sparse lines “to focus more on the bare essentials of writing songs”—a deliberate choice that permeates the two tracks. Without strict harmony and rhythm sections, Mnemonist thrives in the crossover. On “Wide Awake,” the keys begin with a similar riff, but West’s vocals declare more (“I’ve got to see what’s next”), leaving the listener to wonder just the same.

Listen to “Macey Park” and “Wide Awake” below:

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