Tonight at Brighton Music Hall, we’re hosting a concert featuring Aubrey Haddard, Latrell James, and Floyd Fuji to celebrate five years of uncovering (by covering) the local music scene. We’re excited to hit this milestone, but tonight’s spotlight is not just on the volunteer writers, editors, photographers, and team members that fuel this site. Rather, it’ll be a celebration of the talent, originality, and diversity of our city’s musicians—those who shape the “Boston sound.”

Get tickets at the door tonight or via Venmo (send $12 to @soundofboston to reserve a ticket, and claim it by presenting a state-issued ID at the door). In the meantime, familiarize yourself with the lineup; we got the chance to chat with each of the local musicians ahead of their sets tonight.

AUBREY HADDARD

How has your neighborhood or community influenced your music?

Boston has been really good to me. I’ve been feeling more and more a feeling of acceptance and belonging here and any success I’ve had here is obviously directly related to that feeling. I couldn’t do it without the community.

What topics or subjects do you explore most in your music?

Mostly love, death, and everyday experiences, related to relationships. The way we interact with each other and the way we interact with the world.

What is your most memorable moment from a live show in Boston?

Last month me and my band celebrated the release of my debut solo album ‘Blue Part’. We had a great tour, but I have never been so overwhelmed on stage to the point where I needed to actually check myself, just completely overwhelmed by the energy of the room and the love directed at us.

What is an everyday item that most closely relates to your music, and why?

I like to write about water, and the way it represents emotions, change and life. I often sing about rain or the ocean, and would say that I am generally inspired by it, it’s all over the album (including the cover.)

How would you explain your music without using genre labels?

Electric evil mermaid sounds.

 

LATRELL JAMES

How has your neighborhood or community influenced your music?

I always say Dorchester is the best place to grow up. There was so many different cultures in this one concentrated area you had no choice but to immerse yourself in it. Having friends from different backgrounds inspired the sounds I use when I create. A lot of my writing process is always visit those memories whenever I need inspiration.

What topics or subjects do you explore most in your music?

I always tend to cover personal feelings in my music. I feel like people connect more with things they feel like they are going through alone. Another topic I cover is food. It is very important to me.

What is your most memorable moment from a live show in Boston?

My favorite live show moment has yet to come. Let’s make the moment happen at Brighton Music Hall on 8/24.

What is an everyday item that most closely relates to your music, and why?

I would say a smart phone. We put all of our personal feelings, relationships and time into our phones. I feel like I do that with my music.

How would you explain your music without using genre labels?

Life music.

 

FLOYD FUJI

How has your neighborhood or community influenced your music?

I’m live in Mission Hill/Roxbury, and I like Roxbury a lot. It’s really cool, and I lucked out by getting a nice place with four other people. It sits on top of the hill, and I can go on my back deck and see all of Boston. It influenced me because everywhere I’ve lived before has been so hectic. I think everybody who has lived anywhere in Boston can speak to that. There are some places that don’t provide a sense of calmness and a clear head space for anyone to think, on top of crazy landlords and things like that. The place I’m staying is super quiet, all the neighbors are super nice, and it’s right next to some of the projects on the back of the hill. Sometimes I’ll play basketball with the kids who come up from the other side. It’s interesting to see kids who grew up in Boston and what they think about a lot of different things.

What topics or subjects do you explore most in your music?

I definitely want to have a sense of joy and relaxation, and I say that in the least smooth jazz way possible. Not a lot of tracks that I hear on the radio that make me rock—where your head is rocking, and your back is going back and forth. I wanted to make music that really fed the soul and kept the soul elements I was already doing. And make it more raw, because people can sense that. Raw emotions—whether that be through love, whether that be through desire and goals and wants, and reality of the things around you. Being unapologetic about it and not trying to sugarcoat it.

What is your most memorable moment from a live show in Boston?

Kyle Thornton & The Company got hit up to play a show at one of the Harvard social clubs. So we took it, just to say that we went to Harvard and partied at Harvard. We’re playing and one of the people that’s part of the social club comes and is like, “Malia Obama is here.” We go downstairs, and she’s on top of a side terrace just standing there with her friends. So my friend Marshawn, who played drums for Kyle Thornton & The Company, went up to her while she was walking around. He was like “Hey, my name’s Marshawn.” She was super nice, said “nice to meet you. You guys sounded really cool.” Marshawn was like, “Thank you. Do you mind if we take a picture?” She was like, “That’s the last thing we can do.” And walks away. That is the coolest memory of playing show in Boston. That was insane. Until this day I can’t fathom that we met her because she’s so cool.

What is an everyday item that most closely relates to your music, and why?

Some type of food. All music can be related to that in a cliche way. Even with myself and trying to be healthy. There’s a lot of foods out there; there’s a lot of music out there. Some days you just want to eat to be full and some days you’re like, “Oh, let me not just stuff my mouth” because this is something that’s a ritual. Some people sit down and cook, and then they’re like, “Ok, this is what I’m putting into my body.” My music is definitely not the healthiest. I wouldn’t say it’s the most conscious. But it also isn’t fast food. So I would say food. If it were a type of food, I’m just going to say salmon. Because I love salmon.

How would you explain your music without using genre labels?

I would say it’s a kaleidoscope of sound. Bright, vibrant colors like oranges, and reds, but it’s really smooth in texture. If it was a texture, it would definitely be a corduroy.

Visit our event page to find more information about our Listen Local Concert tonight.

 

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